Oct 122010
 

Raising egg laying hens is a great family project that everyone in can enjoy. Most people keep hens in their backyard for the fresh eggs they provide.  Chicken egg laying problems can be very upsetting for families that depend on their eggs. But it is a fact that if you are going to keep chickens, you are going to experience chicken egg laying problems at one point or another.

Chicken egg laying problems can cause panic in new chicken owners and can frustrate chicken owners who really need maximum egg production every day from their hens. Usually you will find that chicken egg laying problems aren’t the result of anything actually being wrong with your egg laying hens.  Chicken egg laying problems tend to be a natural reaction to a variety of conditions.

One of the most common causes of chicken egg laying problems is the diminished number of daylight hours that occurs in the fall.  When there are not enough daylight hours, your hens will naturally start laying fewer eggs.  This isn’t really a chicken laying problem and is more a rhythm of nature kind of occurrence.

I allow my hens to take a break during the shorter winter months because I just use the eggs for me, my family and some friends.  It gives my hens a rest and I worm my hens during this time.  I have to toss any eggs I get when I worm my flock so less eggs or even no eggs during this period of time is not really a problem for me personally.

If you really need your egg laying hens to increase their egg production back to summer levels, then you will need to provide around fourteen hours of “daylight” to get them to kick back into optimum egg production. 

As far as chicken egg laying problems go, this one is easy enough to solve.  Just hang a heat lamp or two in your chicken house to increase the amount of “daylight” your egg laying hens get every day.  The heat lamps will also make the hen house warmer which is another important factor in egg production.  It’s also important to note that the colder the exterior temperature, the fewer eggs you will get from your hens.  It’s best to put the light on a timer so that it doesn’t run all the time.

Your hens will probably take a few days to a week or more to adjust to the new “daylight” hours but once they do, your egg laying should ramp back up again.  Lack of enough daylight hours is just one of many chicken egg laying problems that you may encounter with your egg laying hens.

This is but one of many causes of chicken egg laying problems.  There can be many other reasons that your chickens are not laying eggs. To learn more about the common reasons why your hens are not laying eggs, CLICK HERE.

Jun 232010
 

chicken breeds Did You Buy The Right Breed Of Chicken For Egg Laying?

Your chickens have become old enough that they are beginning to lay eggs but you might wonder “How many eggs are normal“.  Look back to when your your chicks initially were picked up and brought home.  They were so tiny and irresistible and funny that it was tough to envision them ever being big enough to lay eggs for you. It is truly amazing that these birds can lay eggs so consistently.

As your chickens get older, you may get a little worried because they weren’t laying eggs like they used to.  As egg product decreases, many people obsessed that they are unhealthy or that they are doing something wrong.  Usually, there is nothing wrong with chickens and is normal.  There are a lot of things that can put your chickens off laying whether it is for a short time or in some cases, forever. I found out that there’s not an easy response to that question since how many eggs are normal for your laying chickens will depend upon a number of things.

5 Egg Laying Essentials

* The breed of chicken matters.  Chicken egg laying is almost completely dependent on the breed of chickens that you invested in.  Anyone that is relying on the fact that you are going to get one egg every single day from every single chicken is going to be disappointed.  A large percentage of chicken breeds will not lay eggs regularly and prolifically for you.  If you are concerned about getting a large number of eggs, it is advisable to pick the breed of chicken you because that is not what they were bred to do.

* How old are your chickens? What is assumed to be to be customary “chicken egg laying” for your hens will also depend on the age of your chickens.  Remember, the majority of hens will be the most prolific egg layers through their first year or two of laying.  As your hens become older, they will lay smaller amounts of eggs and they won’t lay eggs as regularly as they did when your chickens were more youthful.  But the flip side of this is that older hens usually produce larger, better quality eggs.  Older hens are also not as  prone to contracting diseases than more youthful hens.

* What season is it? Winter, summer, etc.  Chicken egg laying is dependent on the time of year and the weather.  Most chickens should produce more eggs more consistently during warmer weather and the longer days that come with summer and fall.  During the cold winter months and in periods of unbearable heat, don’t be alarmed if you find that you do not get any eggs at all.

During these times, you will find that egg production will normally be irregular and you will only get an egg if you are really, really lucky  As long as your hens still look healthy and happy, it is perfectly normal and there is usually nothing wrong with your flock.

* Are your chickens moulting?  Any time you note that your chickens are molting (losing a lot of feathers) your egg production will drop.  How do you know if your chickens are moulting?  If you start noticing a lot of feathers on the ground, they are moulting.  Moulting is hard on your hens and can cause your chickens to produce a smaller amount of eggs than is typical for your flock.  Don’t worry though because as soon as they are done moulting, your hens will start to lay again.

* Are your chicken healthy?  The number of eggs your chickens lay will be almost completely dependent on how hale and hearty your chickens are.  If you notice that your chickens show an abrubt decline in laying, then something may be up with them. Carefully inspect the legs and feet of your chickens carefully for scales that are raised or swollen as mites may just be your problem.  You have to get rid of the mites or your chickens will not be able to lay very many eggs.

* Give them enough room. Even if you only purchased breeds that are specifially bred to be laying chickens, they will not produce if they are kept confined in an area which is overly crowded or an area that is not kept properly ventilated and is not clean. You might have to build more chicken coops and chicken runs so that you can split up your flock.

These are some of the common reasons why your chicken egg laying may decline.  Most of the items discussed really can’t be fixed and you just have to live with lower production.

Click on the links to find out more on chicken health and common chicken health problems.

 


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